Dead on the Fourth of July. When three presidents died on the holiday, Americans saw the work of God

Dead on the Fourth of July. When three presidents died on the holiday, Americans saw the work of God

Dead on the Fourth of July. When three presidents died on the holiday, Americans saw the work of God

No July 4, 1831, James Monroe died of heart failure and tuberculosis with his daughter in New York. The Fifth President of the United States had tried to write an autobiography but could not finish because his health deteriorated slowly after his wife’s death last year.

Thousands of people have attended the narrow streets of New York to see the 73-year-old hearse open to the cemetery of the marble vaulted family.

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With his death, there was a strange coincidence that many people could not ignore. Monroe became the third president and founding father to die on July 4.

Five years earlier, on the 50th anniversary of the declaration of independence, friends for a long time and occasional rival Thomas Jefferson and John Adams also died.

“Thomas Jefferson Survives,” is supposed to be one of Adams’s last words to his deathbed in Quincy, Massachusetts. He did not realize that his friend died that day July 4, 1826, in his beloved Monticello area of ​​more than 500,000 in Virginia.

For many Americans in the 19th century, the death of three men they helped find and guides the young United States overcame coincidence.

“Once again, our national anniversary was marked by one of these events, it is not possible to attribute the opportunity,” wrote the Boston Daily travelers July 8, 1831.

“Three of the four presidents who left the scene of their usefulness and glory did not expire on the anniversary of the birth of a national day than all others, had they been allowed to choose [which] would probably be chosen by the end of their career” , Wrote the New York Evening Post on the day after Monroe’s death.

Adams was the second president from 1797 to 1801, followed by Jefferson, who served until 1809.

But long before the 13 colonies had gained their independence, Adams and Jefferson played a vital role in the creation of the document in which he said that men are created equal and have the right to “life, freedom and the pursuit of happiness” .

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